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What if you woke up in your 30s......

What if you woke up in your 30s, realizing you're still wondering what you want to become when you grow up? If you'd openly talk about it, many might be quick to label you as infantile, immature, unable to take responsibility etc. etc. 

But here's another perspective. What if this could the most important question you'd ever ask, arising in your mind precisely when it should. 

Questions are fascinating because they give birth to new stories and because they tend to re-route our lives in a natural and creative way.

Clayton Christensen once said that a question is a place in your head where an answer can rest. If you'd allow it to make itself comfortable enough to abide in your consciousness for a while without losing its importance, surprising things can happen. A whole galaxy of new questions forms around it to help you understand what exactly you are seeking to answer. For example, you could find yourself wondering:
Write these satelite questions down. Map them and see how they connect to each other to form a gateway to self-realization. Explore it without fear, allowing yourself to neutrally contemplate each question without being overwhelmed by it. You set the pace. The questions are nothing but friendly form of guidance. They will wait until you feel ready, until you've done your research in the outside world and looked within yourself long enough to feel what is true for you. 

©REBELLICCA, 2018

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Imperfectly Crafted

Perhaps you feared
You.
You
In me
With me
Through me
Around me
Caught up in our
Forever.
So
You
Banished
All memories of
Us
Into an exile of
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Where no
Future is
Safe or
Possible.
Yet
The present of our
Past
Bleeds through
These imperfectly crafted
Dimensions
Reminding
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©REBELLICCA, 2020

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